+- +-

+- You

Welcome, Guest.
Please login or register.
 
 
 
Forgot your password?

+- Site Data

Members
Total Members: 87
Latest: brewski
New This Month: 0
New This Week: 0
New Today: 0
Stats
Total Posts: 112786
Total Topics: 4374
Most Online Today: 3
Most Online Ever: 55
(April 18, 2016, 06:09:38 pm)
Users Online
Members: 0
Guests: 0
Total: 0

Poll

After this, which exciting new Tut University course are you looking forwards to the most?

A History of Cults in America (with emphasis on Nolan and Snyder)
4 (36.4%)
Classical Literature that will probably be remade in a film starring Benedict Cumberbatch
2 (18.2%)
Star Trek: The Original Series 101
3 (27.3%)
Spanish 101 with Jim Raynor
1 (9.1%)
Art History
1 (9.1%)

Total Members Voted: 11

Author Topic: Why Marvel is Destroying America: Taught by Professor Tutweiller  (Read 2771 times)

Tut

  • God-King
  • Paul Thomas Anderson
  • **********
  • Posts: 6690
  • It's all over now, baby blue...
  • Location: Nice try, NSA
The first company I would break up would be Wal-Mart. The second would be Disney.

Disney isn’t a monopoly yet. There are still some things they don’t own (Transformers, DC Comics, and Harry Potter, to name a few). But just give them time. They shall consume every aspect of pop culture before long.
It only took them a year after this post to get there.

I think we're overdue for another installment in this series. Not to toot my own horn, but some of this was highly prescient.

ChillinDylan Godsend

  • God-King
  • Wes Anderson
  • **********
  • Posts: 7478
I missed all of this.  There is some interesting stuff in here.  While I try to evaluate each MCU movie as a separate entity, it is undeniable that they recycle the same formula over and over again.  However, there are distinctions between films.  When talking about acting, I would submit that Iron Man 3 may have the best single acting job with Robert Downey Jr.  When talking about humor, some (like GOTG) is very sharp and witty while others (Avengers, Thor 2) is clunky, ill-timed, and wooden.  This universe of films spreads out fairly evenly on my grade scale - so, while there are common style and devices within all of them, how they are written, timed, and delivered vary throughout.

Tut

  • God-King
  • Paul Thomas Anderson
  • **********
  • Posts: 6690
  • It's all over now, baby blue...
  • Location: Nice try, NSA
I missed all of this.  There is some interesting stuff in here.  While I try to evaluate each MCU movie as a separate entity, it is undeniable that they recycle the same formula over and over again.  However, there are distinctions between films.  When talking about acting, I would submit that Iron Man 3 may have the best single acting job with Robert Downey Jr.  When talking about humor, some (like GOTG) is very sharp and witty while others (Avengers, Thor 2) is clunky, ill-timed, and wooden.  This universe of films spreads out fairly evenly on my grade scale - so, while there are common style and devices within all of them, how they are written, timed, and delivered vary throughout.

Have you read the essays yet? If not, I'd recommend installments 1, 4, 7, 8, and 10. The rest aren't as good. I honestly think I blew my wad on Part 1; it's arguably the biggest complaint I have about these films (and the most universally applicable).

I'll agree that the quality of the acting is wildly different in some of the films, and so is the humor at some points. However, I'd say the issues I raised in those particular five installments are fairly universal across the series, perhaps excluding the first Iron Man film. I won't get into GOTG 2, but I found it to be on the level of Pixels in terms of humor (this might be good for a new installment). Once I laid out the description of the Humor of Juxtaposition, I started seeing it everywhere, and it frustrates me to no end.

I've also just noticed that I have a new installment on Letterboxd that I did not post here...

------------------------------------------



Lesson #11: The Cultural Tyranny of Fan Service

In the tenth installment of this series, I discussed the effect that Marvel movies have had on the profession of film critiquing. My thesis was that critics, due to the sudden advent of the internet and the simultaneous decline of print media, have been forced to censor their own opinions for fear of alienating readers. Instead of acting as a check on the powers of the studios, they are kowtowing to the basest desires of the audiences, offering only token resistance to the unstoppable onslaught of franchise films. They are no longer safeguarding the interests of moviegoers and artists against the laziness of soulless corporate products. In short, the system is not functioning the way it should.

Yet while critics are certainly complicit in the gradual dumbing-down of mainstream film culture, none of this would be happening if it weren’t for the fans. Despite everything I’ve written in these essays, millions of people still go to see these films. I find that hard to wrap my mind around. Remember how shocked people were when upwards of sixty million voters cast ballots for Donald Trump? That’s how I feel every time a new Marvel movie is released.

Speaking of The Donald... the last few years have been characterized by a backlash against the “elites,” culminating in the events of 2016, from Brexit to the election of President Trump. What we tend to forget is that this mentality isn’t limited solely to politics. When it comes to film discussion these days, the label “critic” is tossed around like a dirty word. Whenever a new DC movie bombs (about every six months or so), DC fans are quick to say that the critics have “lost touch” with the “average moviegoer.” And woe to the unfortunate critic who dares to speak out against these films, because they might receive death threats from hateful fanboys who want their websites taken down. I’m surprised they aren’t chanting “Lock Him Up” in the comment sections of Anthony Lane’s reviews.

Who are these people? Where do they come from? Well, in my admittedly limited experience with these communities (which call themselves “fandoms”), I’ve found that a passion for the source material is only a part of their motivation. What they really seem to seek is belonging and companionship-- a sense of community that their day-to-day lives may not be giving them. This may sound condescending, but I assure you that it’s completely in line with the interactions I’ve had with Marvel fans on the internet. They are generally young men, between the ages of 14 and 30, who use their forums as an outlet for their complaints about critics and “snobs”-- as well as their inability to attract women. The lack of self-awareness they display is routinely astounding.

These individuals feel the need to define themselves through group membership, and so they seek these communities out. Once there, the echo chamber effect takes over, and they begin to think that their views are socially acceptable and should be voiced as often and as loudly as possible. This also leaves them open to subtle manipulation by the corporate powers that be-- it’s no secret that before the release of The Force Awakens, Disney paid dozens of websites to run articles praising the Star Wars prequels in an effort to revive the least lucrative part of their new property. Since then, I’ve noticed quite a few prequel-praising contests going on in comment sections across the internet, perpetuating themselves in a worldwide chain reaction. It’s as if these people are literally competing with one another to see who can have the worst taste.

This is not unlike the way “fake news” has propagated throughout partisan websites, from The Huffington Post and Tumblr on the far left to Breitbart and 4Chan on the far right. Rather than bring people with opposing views together to discuss politics and film, the internet seems to have naturally separated them into camps-- camps which are then systematically targeted by corporate interests whose only motivation is to get clicks and likes. These groups see one another as enemies, and direct their own unique brands of vitriolic language at anyone who points out the fact that they’re being duped. With the alt-left and alt-right, it’s “racist” and “cuck.” With critics and fanboys, it’s “neckbeard” and “hipster.”



A major difference, however, is that while the alt-left and alt-right are somewhat evenly matched, the ratio of fanboys to those with higher standards for film is completely disproportionate. If things were a little more equal, perhaps I wouldn’t be writing this essay right now. But the fanboys have all but drowned out the last voices of reasoned criticism and rational debate on the internet. In lieu of reasonable arguments, they typically use one of the following three ludicrous claims.

1) Citing box office numbers as an indicator of quality. Oh boy. Sounds ridiculous, right? But trust me, this happens more often than you’d think. Not only is this a bandwagon fallacy, but this argument is skewed against R-rated films, and will always reward movies that perform well in the Chinese market (Transformers 4, anyone?). So isn’t it interesting that this metric ends up holding movies about giant robots in such high regard, yet dismisses films like The Hateful Eight completely? Could this be because it didn’t get released in China? No, that couldn’t possibly be it.

2) Citing critical response as an indicator of quality. “Well, the critics liked it, so you’re in the minority.” Um... okay? You mean the critics who you send death threats to if they dislike a Nolan movie? You mean the critics whose jobs are increasingly unstable due to the oversaturation of the market by idiots like Chris Stuckmann and have to compensate accordingly? You mean the exact same critics who you direct passionate, violent gibberish at whenever a DC movie tanks, yet praise up and down whenever they “get it right?” Ah. Those critics. I see. How convenient that whenever the critics agree with you, they’re experts, yet whenever they disagree, they “just hate fun.” Which brings me to the last (and arguably worst) of the three...

3)“Movies are just supposed to be fun.” Aside from relying on a completely subjective definition of the word “fun,” this argument makes the inane assertion that movies are “supposed” to be anything. Sorry, but no director has the responsibility to entertain you with constant explosions and quippy dialogue, like dangling a shiny object in front of a cat. What is fun? Is it sitting in an air-conditioned theater eating popcorn while watching CGI fight scenes fly by? If so, count me out. “Fun” sounds horribly boring.

As always, these things wouldn’t irk me so much if the films in question were being made for niche audiences, and if their effect were significantly diminished. But fandoms have become a loud and vocal minority-- not a week goes by without a franchise film cycling to the top of the box office. These movies aim to please passionate fanboys, yes, but at the same time, they’re carefully constructed to appeal to mass audiences. Like a radical religious group, the fandoms have inflicted their vision upon the rest of us, and what we’re left with is a barren wasteland where movie theaters are closing down and superhero films crush all competition. I’m sick of it.

These people have no standards whatsoever. You would think that if they truly cared about the source material, they would direct their passionate diatribes at things like Star Trek Into Darkness, the Hobbit trilogy, Man of Steel, and Rogue One. You’d be wrong, though-- it really doesn’t matter how much these franchise films pervert their source material, so long as they’re released under the umbrella of something familiar. Of all the many crimes fandoms have perpetrated, the most egregious is valuing branding over substance. A new Hobbit movie? Here’s my money! Superheroes fighting each other? Here’s my money!

Every ticket sold by Avengers: Age of Ultron sent a message, however small. It encouraged audiences and critics to lower their standards, and it encouraged studios to wrest more control away from the actual artists involved in these products-- er-- projects. Moviegoers everywhere are living under the influence of rabid fanboys who now have immense control over the film industry, simply because their favorite franchises are being adapted to the big screen. Do you really think they'll be pushing for more dialogue-driven scenes, more complex characters, and actual messages in their movies? That's a laugh. No, it's far more likely that, in an effort to fit in with their chosen groups, these fans will heap approval upon every installment in their favorite franchises, no matter how dismal. They will denounce dissenters as "enemies of fun" and "hipsters," and will publicly shame critics who do not conform.

They will do all of this... because they are insane.
Like Like x 1 View List

ChillinDylan Godsend

  • God-King
  • Wes Anderson
  • **********
  • Posts: 7478
I missed all of this.  There is some interesting stuff in here.  While I try to evaluate each MCU movie as a separate entity, it is undeniable that they recycle the same formula over and over again.  However, there are distinctions between films.  When talking about acting, I would submit that Iron Man 3 may have the best single acting job with Robert Downey Jr.  When talking about humor, some (like GOTG) is very sharp and witty while others (Avengers, Thor 2) is clunky, ill-timed, and wooden.  This universe of films spreads out fairly evenly on my grade scale - so, while there are common style and devices within all of them, how they are written, timed, and delivered vary throughout.

Have you read the essays yet? If not, I'd recommend installments 1, 4, 7, 8, and 10. The rest aren't as good. I honestly think I blew my wad on Part 1; it's arguably the biggest complaint I have about these films (and the most universally applicable).

I'll agree that the quality of the acting is wildly different in some of the films, and so is the humor at some points. However, I'd say the issues I raised in those particular five installments are fairly universal across the series, perhaps excluding the first Iron Man film. I won't get into GOTG 2, but I found it to be on the level of Pixels in terms of humor (this might be good for a new installment). Once I laid out the description of the Humor of Juxtaposition, I started seeing it everywhere, and it frustrates me to no end.


I skimmed the essays - that's why I resurrected this thread.  There's a lot of good stuff in those.  I actually quite enjoyed GOTG 2 - I didn't find it in any way similar to Pixels in terms of humor.  I thought there were a lot of really funny moments between Drax/Mantis, the Rocket/Baby Groot bomb scene, Rocket bagging on Taserface, Baby Groot bringing the different/wrong items to the jail, etc.  I thought all of those were well done.  I also thought there were a couple of poorly timed/executed comedic moments - like Peter turning into Pac-Man and the whole "fruit not ripe" deal.  From my vantage point, the humor in Avengers and Thor 2 was much, much worse.

Robert Neville

  • God-King
  • Zack Snyder
  • ******
  • Posts: 1866
I remember the time you wrote a Quora answer in response to a Black Panther question stating the main thing Marvel fans watch them for is explosions. When I looked at your profile recently, it wasn't there. Just how bad was the backlash?

Tut

  • God-King
  • Paul Thomas Anderson
  • **********
  • Posts: 6690
  • It's all over now, baby blue...
  • Location: Nice try, NSA
I remember the time you wrote a Quora answer in response to a Black Panther question stating the main thing Marvel fans watch them for is explosions. When I looked at your profile recently, it wasn't there. Just how bad was the backlash?

I vaguely remember that. But as I'm sure you know, I never delete anything due to backlash-- I delete things because they don't provoke enough of a backlash. I think that question was dying down when I wrote that answer, so it got a measly five upvotes and I dumped it.

Robert Neville

  • God-King
  • Zack Snyder
  • ******
  • Posts: 1866
I remember the time you wrote a Quora answer in response to a Black Panther question stating the main thing Marvel fans watch them for is explosions. When I looked at your profile recently, it wasn't there. Just how bad was the backlash?

I vaguely remember that. But as I'm sure you know, I never delete anything due to backlash-- I delete things because they don't provoke enough of a backlash. I think that question was dying down when I wrote that answer, so it got a measly five upvotes and I dumped it.

My first thought was actually that it got collapsed into oblivion. Though, now I remember collapsed answers are still visible normally on profiles, unless you downvoted them personally.

Did you try commenting on the more popular answers, though? That can often lead to more attention than writing one's own, especially if your answer won't be a long one anyway. (Quora automatically gives more weight to longer answers with more images, and this can sometimes even override more upvoted answers, and/or answers from those with much greater "PeopleRank".)

Tut

  • God-King
  • Paul Thomas Anderson
  • **********
  • Posts: 6690
  • It's all over now, baby blue...
  • Location: Nice try, NSA
I remember the time you wrote a Quora answer in response to a Black Panther question stating the main thing Marvel fans watch them for is explosions. When I looked at your profile recently, it wasn't there. Just how bad was the backlash?

I vaguely remember that. But as I'm sure you know, I never delete anything due to backlash-- I delete things because they don't provoke enough of a backlash. I think that question was dying down when I wrote that answer, so it got a measly five upvotes and I dumped it.

My first thought was actually that it got collapsed into oblivion. Though, now I remember collapsed answers are still visible normally on profiles, unless you downvoted them personally.

Did you try commenting on the more popular answers, though? That can often lead to more attention than writing one's own, especially if your answer won't be a long one anyway. (Quora automatically gives more weight to longer answers with more images, and this can sometimes even override more upvoted answers, and/or answers from those with much greater "PeopleRank".)

See, if I start posting my anti-Marvel rants as answers on there, I'll keep getting Marvel-related content on my feed. I'm fine to do movie discussion elsewhere and keep Quora reserved for politics. I've gotten a sizable following and a lot of upvotes for my political answers, and next week I'm going to start using the site more frequently to push my nutty worldview.

Charles Longboat Jr.

  • Wes Anderson
  • *********
  • Posts: 7181
  • Upon us all a little rain must fall
Nice work, Diego. It’s likely been discussed by other people on various sites but maybe one of your essays could be on the superficiality of corporate diversity (in regards to Disney, potentially) and how these blockbusters are the only things people actually care about when they refer to meaningful on-screen diversity. You could probably plug in how people suddenly have the idea that Wonder Woman and Black Panther are Oscar worthy just because they broke boundaries in their field and because they made a ton of money (or the 2016 Ghostbusters reboot).

It wouldn’t be condemning diversity, as that’s not inherently a bad goal,  but it would be criticizing the climate that fast food cinema has created where people are too lazy to seek out foreign films, indie films from diverse creative minds, or films starring the diverse actors that they’d want to see in other films (e.g. Where was the audience that turned up for Civil War/Black Panther for Chadwick Boseman when his Thurgood Marshall biopic could only muster a $10 million gross?). It’s a shame when films that are subtly diverse like Annihilation are overlooked because corporate giants need to publicize how stuff like their Wrinkle in Time adaptation is “the movie America needs right now”.

Another point (that may be somewhat tangential or superfluous) is that this whole cultural trend of “kids being able to see themselves onscreen” indirectly projects the message that physically similar people are the only things people can resonate with (or that real life figures are inferior as role models) which I think runs counter to the concept of actually compelling characters, whose struggles and traits should speak universal volumes regardless of physical characteristics. That may be the goal of this cinematic diversity movement but they’re certainly not telegraphing it that way from what I’ve seen.

ChillinDylan Godsend

  • God-King
  • Wes Anderson
  • **********
  • Posts: 7478
I remember the time you wrote a Quora answer in response to a Black Panther question stating the main thing Marvel fans watch them for is explosions. When I looked at your profile recently, it wasn't there. Just how bad was the backlash?

I vaguely remember that. But as I'm sure you know, I never delete anything due to backlash-- I delete things because they don't provoke enough of a backlash. I think that question was dying down when I wrote that answer, so it got a measly five upvotes and I dumped it.

Were you called a racist in all 5?  Seeing as how you mentioned Black Panther without slobbering all over it, I'd expect that to be the response.

ChillinDylan Godsend

  • God-King
  • Wes Anderson
  • **********
  • Posts: 7478
I remember the time you wrote a Quora answer in response to a Black Panther question stating the main thing Marvel fans watch them for is explosions. When I looked at your profile recently, it wasn't there. Just how bad was the backlash?

I vaguely remember that. But as I'm sure you know, I never delete anything due to backlash-- I delete things because they don't provoke enough of a backlash. I think that question was dying down when I wrote that answer, so it got a measly five upvotes and I dumped it.

My first thought was actually that it got collapsed into oblivion. Though, now I remember collapsed answers are still visible normally on profiles, unless you downvoted them personally.

Did you try commenting on the more popular answers, though? That can often lead to more attention than writing one's own, especially if your answer won't be a long one anyway. (Quora automatically gives more weight to longer answers with more images, and this can sometimes even override more upvoted answers, and/or answers from those with much greater "PeopleRank".)

See, if I start posting my anti-Marvel rants as answers on there, I'll keep getting Marvel-related content on my feed. I'm fine to do movie discussion elsewhere and keep Quora reserved for politics. I've gotten a sizable following and a lot of upvotes for my political answers, and next week I'm going to start using the site more frequently to push my nutty worldview.

End every post with MoS SUCKS!!!

Tut

  • God-King
  • Paul Thomas Anderson
  • **********
  • Posts: 6690
  • It's all over now, baby blue...
  • Location: Nice try, NSA
Nice work, Diego. It’s likely been discussed by other people on various sites but maybe one of your essays could be on the superficiality of corporate diversity (in regards to Disney, potentially) and how these blockbusters are the only things people actually care about when they refer to meaningful on-screen diversity. You could probably plug in how people suddenly have the idea that Wonder Woman and Black Panther are Oscar worthy just because they broke boundaries in their field and because they made a ton of money (or the 2016 Ghostbusters reboot).

It wouldn’t be condemning diversity, as that’s not inherently a bad goal,  but it would be criticizing the climate that fast food cinema has created where people are too lazy to seek out foreign films, indie films from diverse creative minds, or films starring the diverse actors that they’d want to see in other films (e.g. Where was the audience that turned up for Civil War/Black Panther for Chadwick Boseman when his Thurgood Marshall biopic could only muster a $10 million gross?). It’s a shame when films that are subtly diverse like Annihilation are overlooked because corporate giants need to publicize how stuff like their Wrinkle in Time adaptation is “the movie America needs right now”.

Another point (that may be somewhat tangential or superfluous) is that this whole cultural trend of “kids being able to see themselves onscreen” indirectly projects the message that physically similar people are the only things people can resonate with (or that real life figures are inferior as role models) which I think runs counter to the concept of actually compelling characters, whose struggles and traits should speak universal volumes regardless of physical characteristics. That may be the goal of this cinematic diversity movement but they’re certainly not telegraphing it that way from what I’ve seen.

I have three more installments in the works. One is about how superhero films encourage authoritarianism (putting one's trust and life in the hands of a powerful superman). The second is about drawing parallels between the postmodern "deconstruction" of other art forms such as painting and sculpture and the compartmentalization of taste we're seeing in film. The third is going to cover this exact subject, but I need to actually see Black Panther before I start writing it.

You're absolutely right though; this bogus corporate activism is physically sickening to me. It's being perpetuated by a group of developmentally stunted millennial women who hate capitalism but love Disney princesses (and see no contradiction there). Adult men and women alike are being encouraged to embrace their inner man-baby, and the infantilization of their entertainment parallels their childish political beliefs. Meanwhile, as you say, America's kids are being slowly conditioned to look at themselves and see only a list of racial and political classifications rather than individuals capable of unique opinions, skills, and original thought. This is being encouraged by the aforementioned wannabe Marxists who control sites like Buzzfeed, and spend their time talking about little kids needing to see people who look like them in the media.

It's insidious, and when I write that installment, I'll likely get quite a blowback on Letterboxd.
Like Like x 1 View List

Tut

  • God-King
  • Paul Thomas Anderson
  • **********
  • Posts: 6690
  • It's all over now, baby blue...
  • Location: Nice try, NSA
I remember the time you wrote a Quora answer in response to a Black Panther question stating the main thing Marvel fans watch them for is explosions. When I looked at your profile recently, it wasn't there. Just how bad was the backlash?

I vaguely remember that. But as I'm sure you know, I never delete anything due to backlash-- I delete things because they don't provoke enough of a backlash. I think that question was dying down when I wrote that answer, so it got a measly five upvotes and I dumped it.

Were you called a racist in all 5?  Seeing as how you mentioned Black Panther without slobbering all over it, I'd expect that to be the response.

No, I don't recall receiving any comments-- just an overall tepid response. That's not to say I haven't gotten backlash on Quora before, though. My answer regarding Oprah's potential presidential candidacy was met with accusations of racism and sexism alike. Still, it received 1,500 upvotes and remains the highest-voted answer to that question (out of well over a hundred responses), cementing my belief that Quora is one of the last bastions of sanity on the internet.

ChillinDylan Godsend

  • God-King
  • Wes Anderson
  • **********
  • Posts: 7478
Meanwhile, as you say, America's kids are being slowly conditioned to look at themselves and see only a list of racial and political classifications

Don't forget gender and sexual classifications - those are being hammered by millennials as much as anything...

ChillinDylan Godsend

  • God-King
  • Wes Anderson
  • **********
  • Posts: 7478
I remember the time you wrote a Quora answer in response to a Black Panther question stating the main thing Marvel fans watch them for is explosions. When I looked at your profile recently, it wasn't there. Just how bad was the backlash?

I vaguely remember that. But as I'm sure you know, I never delete anything due to backlash-- I delete things because they don't provoke enough of a backlash. I think that question was dying down when I wrote that answer, so it got a measly five upvotes and I dumped it.

Were you called a racist in all 5?  Seeing as how you mentioned Black Panther without slobbering all over it, I'd expect that to be the response.

No, I don't recall receiving any comments-- just an overall tepid response. That's not to say I haven't gotten backlash on Quora before, though. My answer regarding Oprah's potential presidential candidacy was met with accusations of racism and sexism alike. Still, it received 1,500 upvotes and remains the highest-voted answer to that question (out of well over a hundred responses), cementing my belief that Quora is one of the last bastions of sanity on the internet.

Seems like most of these comments are completely on your side.  Maybe I didn't scroll down far enough.

Tut

  • God-King
  • Paul Thomas Anderson
  • **********
  • Posts: 6690
  • It's all over now, baby blue...
  • Location: Nice try, NSA
I remember the time you wrote a Quora answer in response to a Black Panther question stating the main thing Marvel fans watch them for is explosions. When I looked at your profile recently, it wasn't there. Just how bad was the backlash?

I vaguely remember that. But as I'm sure you know, I never delete anything due to backlash-- I delete things because they don't provoke enough of a backlash. I think that question was dying down when I wrote that answer, so it got a measly five upvotes and I dumped it.

Were you called a racist in all 5?  Seeing as how you mentioned Black Panther without slobbering all over it, I'd expect that to be the response.

No, I don't recall receiving any comments-- just an overall tepid response. That's not to say I haven't gotten backlash on Quora before, though. My answer regarding Oprah's potential presidential candidacy was met with accusations of racism and sexism alike. Still, it received 1,500 upvotes and remains the highest-voted answer to that question (out of well over a hundred responses), cementing my belief that Quora is one of the last bastions of sanity on the internet.

Seems like most of these comments are completely on your side.  Maybe I didn't scroll down far enough.

Yeah, another thing I like about Quora-- they collapse heavily downvoted comments waaaaaaay at the bottom of the chain.

ChillinDylan Godsend

  • God-King
  • Wes Anderson
  • **********
  • Posts: 7478
I remember the time you wrote a Quora answer in response to a Black Panther question stating the main thing Marvel fans watch them for is explosions. When I looked at your profile recently, it wasn't there. Just how bad was the backlash?

I vaguely remember that. But as I'm sure you know, I never delete anything due to backlash-- I delete things because they don't provoke enough of a backlash. I think that question was dying down when I wrote that answer, so it got a measly five upvotes and I dumped it.

Were you called a racist in all 5?  Seeing as how you mentioned Black Panther without slobbering all over it, I'd expect that to be the response.

No, I don't recall receiving any comments-- just an overall tepid response. That's not to say I haven't gotten backlash on Quora before, though. My answer regarding Oprah's potential presidential candidacy was met with accusations of racism and sexism alike. Still, it received 1,500 upvotes and remains the highest-voted answer to that question (out of well over a hundred responses), cementing my belief that Quora is one of the last bastions of sanity on the internet.

Seems like most of these comments are completely on your side.  Maybe I didn't scroll down far enough.

Yeah, another thing I like about Quora-- they collapse heavily downvoted comments waaaaaaay at the bottom of the chain.

I actually have a tough time working Quora sometimes - the link to view the comments or other answers isn't as clear as someone my age would like it to be...but that's an interesting sort order for stacking the answers.

ChillinDylan Godsend

  • God-King
  • Wes Anderson
  • **********
  • Posts: 7478
I remember the time you wrote a Quora answer in response to a Black Panther question stating the main thing Marvel fans watch them for is explosions. When I looked at your profile recently, it wasn't there. Just how bad was the backlash?

I vaguely remember that. But as I'm sure you know, I never delete anything due to backlash-- I delete things because they don't provoke enough of a backlash. I think that question was dying down when I wrote that answer, so it got a measly five upvotes and I dumped it.

My first thought was actually that it got collapsed into oblivion. Though, now I remember collapsed answers are still visible normally on profiles, unless you downvoted them personally.

Did you try commenting on the more popular answers, though? That can often lead to more attention than writing one's own, especially if your answer won't be a long one anyway. (Quora automatically gives more weight to longer answers with more images, and this can sometimes even override more upvoted answers, and/or answers from those with much greater "PeopleRank".)

See, if I start posting my anti-Marvel rants as answers on there, I'll keep getting Marvel-related content on my feed. I'm fine to do movie discussion elsewhere and keep Quora reserved for politics. I've gotten a sizable following and a lot of upvotes for my political answers, and next week I'm going to start using the site more frequently to push my nutty worldview.

Well, in a week or so there may be a lot of responses to MCU stuff like this...

ChillinDylan Godsend

  • God-King
  • Wes Anderson
  • **********
  • Posts: 7478
Like Like x 1 View List

ChillinDylan Godsend

  • God-King
  • Wes Anderson
  • **********
  • Posts: 7478
Nice work, Diego. It’s likely been discussed by other people on various sites but maybe one of your essays could be on the superficiality of corporate diversity (in regards to Disney, potentially) and how these blockbusters are the only things people actually care about when they refer to meaningful on-screen diversity. You could probably plug in how people suddenly have the idea that Wonder Woman and Black Panther are Oscar worthy just because they broke boundaries in their field and because they made a ton of money (or the 2016 Ghostbusters reboot).

It wouldn’t be condemning diversity, as that’s not inherently a bad goal,  but it would be criticizing the climate that fast food cinema has created where people are too lazy to seek out foreign films, indie films from diverse creative minds, or films starring the diverse actors that they’d want to see in other films (e.g. Where was the audience that turned up for Civil War/Black Panther for Chadwick Boseman when his Thurgood Marshall biopic could only muster a $10 million gross?). It’s a shame when films that are subtly diverse like Annihilation are overlooked because corporate giants need to publicize how stuff like their Wrinkle in Time adaptation is “the movie America needs right now”.

Another point (that may be somewhat tangential or superfluous) is that this whole cultural trend of “kids being able to see themselves onscreen” indirectly projects the message that physically similar people are the only things people can resonate with (or that real life figures are inferior as role models) which I think runs counter to the concept of actually compelling characters, whose struggles and traits should speak universal volumes regardless of physical characteristics. That may be the goal of this cinematic diversity movement but they’re certainly not telegraphing it that way from what I’ve seen.

I have three more installments in the works. One is about how superhero films encourage authoritarianism (putting one's trust and life in the hands of a powerful superman). The second is about drawing parallels between the postmodern "deconstruction" of other art forms such as painting and sculpture and the compartmentalization of taste we're seeing in film. The third is going to cover this exact subject, but I need to actually see Black Panther before I start writing it.

You're absolutely right though; this bogus corporate activism is physically sickening to me. It's being perpetuated by a group of developmentally stunted millennial women who hate capitalism but love Disney princesses (and see no contradiction there). Adult men and women alike are being encouraged to embrace their inner man-baby, and the infantilization of their entertainment parallels their childish political beliefs. Meanwhile, as you say, America's kids are being slowly conditioned to look at themselves and see only a list of racial and political classifications rather than individuals capable of unique opinions, skills, and original thought. This is being encouraged by the aforementioned wannabe Marxists who control sites like Buzzfeed, and spend their time talking about little kids needing to see people who look like them in the media.

It's insidious, and when I write that installment, I'll likely get quite a blowback on Letterboxd.

Three more?  That's a lot of reading.......

 

+- Hot Threads

What song are you listening to - Part II by Tho Master Fie
November 14, 2018, 01:06:43 pm

THE OFFICIAL MOVIE WATCHING THREAD by Crohn's Boy
November 11, 2018, 05:51:35 pm

The 2018 US Midterms and Goober-natorial Elections Thread by Robert Neville
November 10, 2018, 12:40:44 pm

2 Fudge 2 Knuckle by Tho Master Fie
November 05, 2018, 10:39:03 am

The Official Movie Trailer/TV Spot Watching Thread by Robert Neville
October 14, 2018, 05:26:22 pm

The Trump Presidency Thread by Robert Neville
October 09, 2018, 05:27:33 pm

2018 Standings by Crohn's Boy
October 07, 2018, 11:13:25 am

Khabib vs. Conor fight by Robert Neville
October 07, 2018, 07:15:48 am

Another reason why SEC is so embarrassing... by The One Who Lurks
October 06, 2018, 07:21:54 pm

Book Thread. What are you reading? by Tut
September 26, 2018, 11:40:42 pm

MWO Movie News, a subsidiary of the Walt Disney Company by Charles Longboat Jr.
September 20, 2018, 07:51:25 pm

Whats your take on movie crowdfunding? by Robert Neville
September 16, 2018, 07:23:03 am

Consensus XXXIII: Netflicks Moovys by Crohn's Boy
September 14, 2018, 04:06:15 pm

THE SCHOOL THREAD! by Tut
September 07, 2018, 04:43:28 pm

Favorite videogame cutscenes by Robert Neville
September 06, 2018, 02:55:25 pm